We all struggle to find places that not only suites the needs of our studying but also our style. As a result, study spaces is highly important for students as it can determine the levels of which a student can concentrate and it can significantly alter the outcome of that study session.

3 places for Individual Studying:
1. Looking for the best place to study alone, away from friends and other distractions? Well look no further! Floors 5 to 7 of the Laurier Library will be your new best-friend in no time if that’s exactly what you want! These floors provide students with individual cubicles where aspiring students can fully concentrate and you are guaranteed to be kept away from any surrounding aliens and fellow golden hawks that you know. These cubicles will accommodate for your style studying from reading and writing to watching online tutorials and/or videos relating to your class work.

2. Quite study rooms in DAWB are open to first come first serve and are located on third, fourth, and fifth floors. Similar to the library, it is open until midnight to students both for individual and group work, though most students use it for individual work. Its style is different from the library cubicles in the sense that it’s more open, tidy, clean, and calm. Also, provides that senses of freedom because of its visibility to other objects and subjects.
3. The Solarium provides much more then the objective of quiet individual studying! The construction of the room provides students the opportunity to study with a view – the outdoors. Through the clear glass windows, one is able to take a break and enjoy the nature’s beauty. If you’re like a bird and must be caged for a while but want your freedom then visit the Solarium and experience it for yourself.

3 Places for Group Work:
1. The 24-Hour Lounge, located in the Fred Nichols Campus Centre is continuously available and open 24 hours. This study lounge is accessible for individual work, group work and available for late night/early morning studying. It has been designed to accommodate all the needs of individual group members by providing group study rooms, computer areas and even couches to take a break or study comfortably. The lounge is located near Laurier’s Wilf’s restaurant and a convenience store so students can grab a bite whilst working away.

2. The Concourse is located centrally on campus and has a lively atmosphere where students can come together to work and not have to worry about being too loud. It allows groups to work without the conscious of being mindful of other students – unlike the Library and Solarium. Therefore, it is not designed only to concentrate on your own work, but also explore, interact, and meet your friends or new people along the way.
3. The newly constructed Lazaridis hall provides a confortable-working environment in a new, modern, state-of-the-art building. Students have the choice to choose between couches and desks to complete their work. Where one can enjoy the aesthetics of the building whilst being able to work with their group. As such, it is designed to be a place of innovation, ideas, and creation – an environment where everyone wants to be!

There are many other areas open for student to utilize for either individual study or group work. So don’t forget to visit Academic buildings with open classroom that are availably during the date such as Bricker Academic, Schelegel, Peters Building and the science atrium.

 

Written by: Latifa Samimi

Who We Are

AUS Laurier is the overarching central hub for student engagement in the Faculty of Arts. Currently supporting over thirty campus clubs, our student-led organization helps foster new initiatives and events to ensure that every Arts student has the opportunity to engage in their passions outside of the classroom. We achieve this through:

Special Initiative Funding

Campus Clubs

Program Associations

Speakers and Events

Academic Advocacy

Undergraduate Arts Journal

Social Innovation Project

Interdepartmental Communication

Clubs

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    Every university has its stereotypes and flaws. If you are or were ever a Laurier student, you’ll totally relate to these:

    1. The fact that they closed down the Tim Hortons at Peter’s

    It was the perfect spot to quickly get coffee and snacks between classes. The line was always a reasonable length and the service was fast. The only other Tims is all the way at science so now we have to travel all the way to the concourse or the library just to get a cup of joe? Pass!

    imgres

    2. The line up at Starbucks between classes  

    Don’t even get me started on that lineup. It. Never. Ends

    imgres

    3. When people talk on silent 7

    It’s called silent seven for a reason. Just study and stop gossiping about what your roommate did last night.

    4. Exams on Sundays

    Exams on Sundays should be illegal. But I guess it helps that we get a fall reading week because of them.

    5. Navigating LORIS

    Most confusing Laurier website yet. How can anyone find what they’re looking for? The best thing to do is just search key words. And is it just me or does it crash just as I’m about to add an important class to my schedule?

    Source: LAZSOC

    loris

    6. Lack of parking space on campus

    Even with a parking pass, there are still no spots on campus to park. You’re better off taking the bus or carpooling.

    7. Small campus means frequently running into people you know

    Sometimes you hit snooze just a few too many times and your left with no time to get ready in the morning. We’ve all been there. Luckily a small campus means you can get to your classes quickly and still have time to get yourself a coffee on campus. But somehow those are the days you’re most likely to run into everyone you know, including that cutie in your tutorial. However, it is nice not having to walk more than 10 minutes to cross campus. And again, not so nice when you run into last night’s drunken mistake.

    8. The Geese

    Not only are they everywhere in Waterloo, but these birds are ferocious! They’re not afraid to attack if you get just a little too close to them. Not to mention the fact that they poop everywhere. They bring a whole new meaning to “a green campus”.

    0503gobus

    9. The sauna that is Wilf’s when it gets crowded

    Any time there’s an event or it just gets busy, wear a t-shirt because no windows mean zero ventilation. Luckily, they have a variety of cool drinks to keep your fluids replenished. Just remember they don’t take OneCard for alcoholic drinks.

    10. When the door from the patio to the concourse suddenly locks

    Whether it’s summer or winter, the door always seems to randomly malfunction. Worst part is when no one in the concourse can hear you knocking on the glass at night to come open the door.

    But at the end of it all, Laurier is an amazing school filled with amazing and diverse people. I guess that’s why it’s great to be a Laurier Golden Hawk.

    Written by – Stephanie Tse

    14524562_10210430207773636_259230541206797013_o

    Who We Are

    AUS Laurier is the overarching central hub for student engagement in the Faculty of Arts. Currently supporting over thirty campus clubs, our student-led organization helps foster new initiatives and events to ensure that every Arts student has the opportunity to engage in their passions outside of the classroom. We achieve this through:

    Special Initiative Funding

    Campus Clubs

    Program Associations

    Speakers and Events

    Academic Advocacy

    Undergraduate Arts Journal

    Social Innovation Project

    Interdepartmental Communication

    Clubs

    See All

    Events

  • What’s Going On

    November 2019
    S M T W T F S
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    Nada Ahmed at The Social Innovation Project

     

    • Be curious. Keep your eyes and your ears open.  

     

    I first learnt about social entrepreneurship in my first year BU111 class. We learnt about Muhammad Yunus, his work in microfinancing, and listened to a video of Michael Porter talk about how business can be a catalyst for social change. We spent less than a class on this, and then moved on. If I hadn’t gone to class, payed attention, or let my curiosity guide me, the beauty of social entrepreneurship would have simply passed by me. Instead I felt deeply inspired and pursued my curiosity myself at home. A few months later, while walking past one of those bulletin boards no one actually reads, I saw a small poster that read, “New Club! The Social Innovation Project. We’re Hiring”. I instantly applied. This I where my social entrepreneurship journey began.

     

    • Emotions suck. Embrace them and push through.  

     

    After I applied, I was granted an interview and was totally excited about it. I remember the morning of my interview clearly because I had just gotten off the phone with a close friend, ending an argument that left me emotional and teary eyed. I was feeling down, embarrassed by my tears, and not in the mood to deal with a club interview. I was very close to not showing up. If I hadn’t pulled myself together, put on some makeup and a smile on my face, I would have missed out on an opportunity that transformed my university experience. Emotions suck, and sometimes you have to embrace them and do what’s right.

     

    • Don’t hesitate to reach out to people. A missed hello is a missed opportunity.  

     

    A few months into my first year with the Social Innovation project, I was sitting at an unrelated “Lunch with the Dean” event at Veritas Café. We were sitting at a u-shaped table where everyone introduced themselves. Across the table, a girl two years older introduced herself as a business student with a passion for social innovation. She didn’t mention anything else about this, and we continued the lunch and everyone went their own way afterwards. I made sure to go up and talk to her before she left, out of pure interest, to see how she was applying herself to social innovation. We had a nice long chat and then went our separate ways. A few days later, she reached out to me and proposed starting something new called “Community Connect”. It was a wonderful idea and I was eager to be involved. Later that summer, The Social Innovation Project adopted the “Community Connect” idea and I become project lead. This is how Community Connect started.

     

    • Don’t take no as an answer.  

     

    Trying to get Community Connect off the ground was tough. We were asking for a lot to happen and in a very short amount of time. Unlike many programs or services, we didn’t have just one group of customers to promote this to. We had to think about organizations, MBA students, and undergraduates all at the same time – each one seemingly more difficult to convince than the other. My first connection with the local K/W nonprofit community was with a women from the Volunteer Action Centre. When I told her about Community Connect, her answer was something along the lines of “The program simply won’t work. And definitely not by September”. I felt naïve and hit by sudden shock of reality, but I didn’t let that “no” sit with me for long. I kept pushing and asked to talk in person. The Volunteer Action Center later became our first community partner (and yes, we started in September).

     

    • Don’t wait for “perfect” – Starting something is better than not starting at all.  

     

    When the September launch time for the program finally came, we were far from where we planned to be. I had two options, to either postpone starting until the Winter semester, or make the most of where we were at in that moment and start anyway. I went with the second option, calling the semester a “pilot launch”. I learnt far more in that one semester than I would have if I waited to feel “ready”. The program’s success far exceeded my expectations. One thing I learned is that you may not ever feel fully “ready” and it will always be a learning experience. I can now happily say that I’ve created an opportunity for a total of 16 undergraduates, 5 MBA students, and built relationships with 3 organizations, with a handful more wanting to be involved in the future. Had I postponed starting, had I waited for perfect, none of this would have happened.

     

    • Good friends make all the difference.  

     

    The Social Innovation Project introduced me to some of the best people I’ve worked with, whom I’ve shared amazing memories with and even better laughs. Good friends make all the difference. No explanation is needed here.

     

    • Recognize when it’s your time to move on.  

     

    The right time to move on isn’t when you have people relying on you to deliver. It’s definitely not the right time to move on when what you’re doing gives you a great sense of reward and satisfaction. Sometimes, stress will lead you to ask yourself “why am I doing this again?” and question why you’re scheduling meetings you don’t have time for. That’s not the right time to move on either.

    The Social Innovation Project and the entire social innovation space at Laurier has made me see the world in a different way, teaching me things I am beyond thankful for. But, life has its way of throwing you in unexpected paths and sometimes you have to recognize your time to shift directions. This leads me back to lesson #1: stay curious, and keep your eyes and ears open.

    Who We Are

    AUS Laurier is the overarching central hub for student engagement in the Faculty of Arts. Currently supporting over thirty campus clubs, our student-led organization helps foster new initiatives and events to ensure that every Arts student has the opportunity to engage in their passions outside of the classroom. We achieve this through:

    Special Initiative Funding

    Campus Clubs

    Program Associations

    Speakers and Events

    Academic Advocacy

    Undergraduate Arts Journal

    Social Innovation Project

    Interdepartmental Communication

    Clubs

    See All

    Events

  • What’s Going On

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    Nada Ahmed at The Social Innovation Project

    In Drake and Trey Songz’s 2009 hit “Successful”, Trey Songz admittedly says “I suppose…I just wanna be successful”. Well, that’s what everyone wants, isn’t it? To be their own success story, to feel accomplished, and to reach a point where their hard work (or not so hard work) got them to where they want to be. But let me stop you there for a second and ask…what does success mean for you? What does it look like? How do you measure it?

    As a business student, this is what I’m told a successful future for me looks like:

    There seems to be an unavoidable shared belief that the smartest people in business work for the biggest banks, in the biggest companies, and at the top level of the highest skyscrapers. When it comes to creating social change however, there’s a weird stigma and it sounds something like this:

    Oh, she works for social justice? She couldn’t have been good at math.

    You want to work for a small organization that helps underprivileged youth? You probably weren’t the top of your class.

    If you think this is an over exaggeration, don’t lie to yourself. Certain symbols spell out “success” more than others. It’s a simple societal truth, and I see it as a very big problem. Blinded by this vague and objective vision of success, we students are told to study hard, land a job, and get a lot of money – and maybe do something great along the way. Well why don’t we start with doing something great? Why don’t we start with “how can I change the world?”.

    We need to redefine how our society defines success.

    The reality is that the world of social innovation, social entrepreneurship, and social change need the smartest, most educated people. We need the best problem solvers, innovators, and intellects. But these top players aren’t going to want to devote their time to solving social issues if it doesn’t sound like the most “successful” option. But why is it not? Is it the money? Can’t let go of your materialistic desires? Lucky for you, not all changemakers still live with their parents:

    • Bill Drayton, Founder and CEO of Ashoka. Ashoka is the global association of the world’s leading social entrepreneurs – individuals with system changing solutions for the world’s most urgent social problems
    • Mark and Mo Constantine, Founders of Lush Cosmetics. Lush cosmetics company leads with environmental awareness and ethical consumerism. Lush products are “naked,” or free of packaging, as they make it their mission to make the world better for “people, animals and the environment.” And they’ve given away almost $6 million to environmental and other worthy causes in the last seven years.
    • Dean KarlanYale economics professor and MIT Poverty Action Lab research fellow.  

    These people are changing the world, making it a better place, and more likely than not, are living in what society would call comfortable living standards – surprise! And if we want more people like them, changemaking has to sound more attractive. Everyone should want to become a changemaker. But…how? This is a difficult question to answer. It’s a wicked problem and although I wish I knew the answer, I don’t.

    Maybe I can’t convince everyone to be a changemaker or shift society’s definition of success away from what is seen on Suits (at least for now). What I can do, however, is start with Community Connect and hope that it becomes something that gives others a place to start their changemaking journey as well. Community Connect’s model works well because it gives the smartest students an opportunity to see how their knowledge can actually make meaningful impact and make it something to be proud of. Everyone has to start somewhere. Sometimes, all that it takes is that small spark of inspiration that eventually leads to big change, and somewhere you choose to define as success.

    Who We Are

    AUS Laurier is the overarching central hub for student engagement in the Faculty of Arts. Currently supporting over thirty campus clubs, our student-led organization helps foster new initiatives and events to ensure that every Arts student has the opportunity to engage in their passions outside of the classroom. We achieve this through:

    Special Initiative Funding

    Campus Clubs

    Program Associations

    Speakers and Events

    Academic Advocacy

    Undergraduate Arts Journal

    Social Innovation Project

    Interdepartmental Communication

    Clubs

    See All

    Events

  • What’s Going On

    November 2019
    S M T W T F S
    « Mar    
     12
    3456789
    10111213141516
    17181920212223
    24252627282930
  • See More

    Program Associations

    See All

    Academics

    Learn More

    Latest Blog Posts

    Laurier Study Spots!

    10 Things Laurier Students Hate

    7 things I learnt from The Social Innovation Project: The Untold Story  

    “I just wanna be successful”

    Visit Blog